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tlg_fcVICKSBURG, Miss. — Sunbury Press has released Taking Lady Gibraltar: Grant’s Convoluted Tour de Force in the West, Dick Schwirian’s historical novel about the capture of Vicksburg, Mississippi by Union forces in 1863.

About the Book:
Taking of Lady Gibraltar is about one of the major events of the Civil War, the campaign to seize Vicksburg by Union forces under Ulysses S. Grant. Before 1863, Vicksburg, situated on high bluffs overlooking the Mississippi River, was thought to be impregnable. Grant created a new reality. The capture of Vicksburg and its garrison was, if not the signature northern victory of the Civil War, at least among the top contenders. It denied the Confederacy free access to the Mississippi River, it split the South in two, and, perhaps most importantly, it ultimately persuaded Abraham Lincoln to appoint Grant commander of all Union armies. In the words of the sixteenth president: “I can’t spare this man. He fights.”

It may be inaccurate to say that Grant won the Civil War for the North, but there is truth in the claim. His success, first in the west and later in the east, was phenomenal. Was he a military genius? Probably not. But he had a keen sense for the opportunistic moment and the fortitude to pursue a course of action relentlessly, once chosen. The Taking of Lady Gibraltar illustrates these qualities—and some shortcomings—in an exciting and stimulating read for anyone who loves Civil War history and historical fiction.

Battle of Vicksburg

Battle of Vicksburg

Excerpt:
April 7, 1862 – The Shiloh Battlefield

On the second day of battle, Union skirmishers began forming their lines at 3:00 AM and were ordered to find the enemy. They did. The evening before, P.G.T. Beauregard had entertained great hopes for taking the day for the Confederacy but was unaware of the Union reinforcements under Don Carlos Buell, who were then arriving from Nashville under cover of darkness. Beauregard had lost half his men on the first day of battle; Grant had gained twenty thousand more. The fighting on the second day was intense but brief. By 4:00 PM, Beauregard ordered a general withdrawal to Corinth, Mississippi in the middle of a cold, relentless hailstorm, some of the hailstones as big as eggs and as hard as musket balls.

Had he wanted to, Grant could have pursued and destroyed Beauregard’s exhausted army. Pursuit of a defeated foe was, after all, a maxim of military tactical manuals. However, pursuit was an undertaking that his own bone-weary, mud-caked army might not be able to sustain. They were tired too.

About the Author:
Dick Schwirian resides in the South Hills of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania with his wife Jo.

Taking Lady Gibraltar: Grant’s Convoluted Tour de Force in the West
Authored by Dick Schwirian
List Price: $19.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
452 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620066508
ISBN-10: 1620066505
BISAC: Fiction / War & Military

Also available on Kindle

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Taking-Lady-Gibraltar-97…

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We are very saddened to hear of the passing of one of our authors, Charles “Ted” Brusaw.  He was the author of the Civil War novel The Roar of Battle, and an upcoming young adult novel about Benedict Arnold entitled Perlious Journey. Following is Ted’s obituary:

trob_fcBRUSAW, Charles “Ted” Of Huber Heights, passed away on Friday, August 7, 2015. Ted was born in Hamilton, OH on October 2, 1931. He graduated from Clarksburg High School (Clarksburg, IN) and served in the Air Force for four years. Ted graduated from Miami University (Oxford, OH) and retired from NCR (Dayton, OH) in 1986. He was the co-author on many text books and had three novels published. He was a member of the Dayton Elks Lodge #58 for over 20 years. Ted is survived by his wife of 60 years, Barbara and two sons, Steven (Chris) Brusaw of Miamisburg, OH and Scott (Julie) Brusaw of Sandpoint, ID. He leaves four grandchildren, Amy, John, Steven and Shawn Brusaw; also special friends, Carl and Mary Lewis. Viewing will be held at the Marker & Heller Funeral Home, Huber Heights Chapel, 5844 Old Troy Pike the evening of Tuesday, August 11, 2015 from 6-8 PM. Services will be held at the funeral home on Wednesday, August 12, 2015 at 10:00 AM. Interment will be at Glen Haven Memorial Gardens. If desired, memorial contributions may be made to the Elks Lodge #58 or The Hospice of Dayton in Ted’s memory. – See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/dayton/obituary.aspx?page=lifestory&pid=175465381#sthash.stUFmuUF.dpuf

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VICKSBURG, Miss.Sunbury Press has released Where Elephants Fought: A Story of Murder and Intrigue During the Civil War, Bridget Smith’s historical novel about the death of Confederate General Earl Van Dorn.

wef_fcFor 150 years, scholars and amateur Civil War buffs have misinterpreted the infamous murder of the well-known Confederate General Earl Van Dorn. Based on twenty years of intense research, the author suggests that all is not as it appears. The real motivation behind the doctor’s decision to murder Van Dorn is not a story of jealousy between a husband and wife, but of loyalty and sacrifice. This story reveals one woman’s struggle with the blame for another’s crime and the secret that fractured the Peters family forever. Perhaps most compelling is the impact the tragedy has had on the Peters family, with the continued perpetuation of the 150 year old lie to this day.

Excerpt:
The soldiers lay down a section of split-rail fence for use in repairing the Duck River Bridge and tied the rails end to end behind an old mule. When the mule got stuck in the frozen muddy road leading to Columbia, they walked on the planks to avoid the flooded roadbed, balancing themselves on the beams like delicate ballerinas. They avoided getting wet at all costs. They understood frostbite. Just keep out of the water was all a fellow had to do. The camp doctor had preached this ever since a bunch of them showed up with black toes after the last march from Ripley.

Crossing the washed-out road had taken more time than anticipated. Most of them were exhausted by the time they reached dry ground, and though he was eager to reach Columbia by evening, General Van Dorn announced they would rest there till morning. They had but a few hours’ march remaining, but complaints had been rumbling up the line since morning. The general knew well the repercussions of pushing the men beyond their limits. The train of men and horses stopped abruptly as orders were sent down the line. A few men grumbled from within the ranks about wasting time now with such a short distance remaining, but Van Dorn ignored them. Better listen to the ones who moaned and complained. Better to stop the procession. Corinth taught him that.

A handful of men from Company E, Third Texas Infantry, warmed their hands by the fire near a grove of trees at the far corner of an old cornfield. General Van Dorn floated from campfire to campfire, making small talk with the men. He stopped just as he reached Private James Thomas who sat at the base of a large elm tree. The private propped his journal against the mass of bark, pulled a pencil from his coat pocket, and scribbled across the top line of the page.

“Private?” Van Dorn smiled at him and leaned forward.

“Yes, sir!” Thomas shot up off the ground and saluted his commander. His face turned red with embarrassment.

“At ease, soldier.” The general leaned against the trunk of the tree. He picked at a blade of grass as he spoke. “About your brother,” he said in a whisper. “He was a fine soldier, son. I want you to know that.”

Private Thomas looked away and nodded. “Yes, sir. Will was a fine soldier indeed. Mighty nice of you to say so.”

Van Dorn put a hand on his shoulder. “You can tell your mama, too. In that letter you’re writing.”

Thomas turned to the general and smiled. “Yes, sir. I’ll tell her. He was mighty fond of you, sir, I’ll tell you that.”

“Thank you, soldier. It’s not often I hear—” But he stopped there. “Give your mother my condolences if you will.”

The private smiled. “Yes sir. I’ll do that right now.” He picked up the notebook and finished the letter as the general walked away toward another group of soldiers.

Van-DornFebruary 21, 1863

Last night we had some biscuits cooked at a house close to our camp. Consequently we fared finely today… The railroad is close to a town named Columbia. This is the place where General Pillow lives who built the fortifications at Fort Pillow on the Mississippi. M. D. Cooper and D. Frierson & Company also reside here. There is a large female Academy in town. We traveled all day in a very hard rain. The water run in my boots. The weather got very cold and I came very near freezing. The Yankee pickets are in fifteen miles of our camp.

General Van Dorn has just spent a private moment with me to let me know his sorrow over poor Will’s passing. He bids me tell my dear mother what a fine soldier Will was. I believe he is the finest soldier and man in the whole of the Confederate army.

From your loving son,
Jimmie

About the Author:
Bridget Smith was born and raised in Columbia, a lush Tennessee valley town filled with antebellum homes and sprawling farms, a setting that both haunted and intrigued her until she could give it life in her Civil War era novel Where Elephants Fought. From the first glimpse into the lives of Jessie McKissack Peters and General Earl Van Dorn, she felt a deep connection to the story and soon found herself immersed in the world of research, a task that what would span nearly twenty years. After receiving her MEd in English, she soon married and moved to a quaint Mississippi town, a town not unlike her beautiful Columbia and equally as steeped in Civil War history. She has taught English for over twenty years and currently teaches English Composition. Though her life is a whirlwind with her four children, she has begun writing her second novel, a modern tale of sin and eccentricities set in her beloved South.

Where Elephants Fought: A Story of Murder and Intrigue During the Civil War
List Price: $19.95
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
336 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620065983
ISBN-10: 1620065983
BISAC: Fiction / Mystery & Detective / Historical

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Where-Elephants-Fought-9…

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kstsph_fcPHILADELPHIASunbury Press has released Keystone Tombstones Philadelphia Region by Joe Farrell and Joe Farley.

About the Book:
Biographies of famous people buried in the Philadelphia Region are the focus of this first localized edition of the Keystone Tombstones. Farrell and Farley have combed the Philadelphia area to bring you the most entertaining tales about interesting people buried in Pennsylvania. Included in this volume:

Bucks County

  • Pearl Buck
  • Saint Katherine Drexel
  • Tom Gola

Chester County

  • Smedley Butler
  • Jim Croce

Delaware County

  • Marian Anderson
  • Paul Arizin
  • John McDermott
  • Herman Webster Mudgett aka Dr. Henry H. Holmes
  • Danny Murtaugh
  • Philadelphia Sinners
  • Bessie Smith
  • Anthony Wayne

Montgomery County

  • Alan Ameche
  • Richie Ashburn
  • Lafayette C. Baker
  • De Bonneville “Bert” Bell
  • Jay Cooke
  • Dave Garroway
  • Winfield Scott Hancock
  • John Hartranft
  • Herman Haupt
  • Teddy Pendergrass
  • Arlen Specter
  • Grover Washington Jr.
  • Harry Wright
  • Samuel K. Zook

Philadelphia County

  • William (Willie) Law Anderson
  • John Barrymore
  • Ulric Dahlgren
  • Four Founders
  • Samuel W. Crawford
  • Benjamin Franklin
  • Joe Frazier
  • General Controversy
  • Franklin Gowen
  • Harry Norbert Kalas
  • Oliver B. Knowles
  • Connie Mack
  • George Meade
  • Robert Morris & James Wilson
  • St. Clair Augustine Mulholland
  • Saint John Newman
  • Dennis O’Kane
  • John C. Pemberton
  • Galusha Pennypacker
  • Frank Rizzo
  • Bill Tilden
  • John Wanamaker

Keystone Tombstones Philadelphia Region: Biographies of Famous People Buried in Pennsylvania
Authored by Joe Farrell, Authored by Joe Farley, Authored by Lawrence Knorr
List Price: $19.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on White paper
360 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620065457
ISBN-10: 1620065452
BISAC: Biography & Autobiography / Rich & Famous

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Keystone-Tombstones-Phil…

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HARRISBURG, Pa.Sunbury Press has released Along the Bethel Trail: The Journey of an African American Faith Community presented by Friends of the Bethel Trail.

About the Book:

Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church of Harrisburg, 1835 – 2015

atbt_fc smThroughout its history, the Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church of Harrisburg has been a critical link in the chain of places, people, and events that bind and strengthen Pennsylvania’s quest for equity, parity, and social justice. Along the Bethel Trail is an anthology of articles by area authors, scholars and humanists that guides readers through the history of this resilient congregation in relationship to the legacy and impact on the community that it serves. Each contributing author writes of a specific historical period and geographic site where the church was located. From that vantage point, the authors explore the social and civic engagement of the congregation and its leadership in time and place, as the church and surrounding communities were continuously uprooted to make room for the expanding state capitol complex. Together their articles frame the impact of the church and congregation on the development of Harrisburg’s diverse community. The combined articles also articulate the struggle of Harrisburg’s African-American community for economic development, sustainability, and a sense of place over the past 180 years.

The anthology of articles supports the eight paneled interpretive signage and self-guided experience along Harrisburg’s Bethel Trail. Discover the location of Bethel’s first church at the current Amtrak station, key 19thcentury sites at Harrisburg’s Forum, Fountain, and Justice buildings along Commonwealth Ave, its 20th century site at 6th and Herr and Bethel’s current 21st century home in midtowns at 1721 N.5th street.

Along the Bethel Trail: The Journey of an African American Faith Community
Authored by Lenwood O. Sloan, Nancy Mendes, and Michael L. Barton
List Price: $29.95
Hardcover: 60 pages
Publisher: Sunbury Press, Inc. (April 15, 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 162006586X
ISBN-13: 978-1620065860
Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 0.3 x 11 inches
Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
BISAC: History / African American

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Along-the-Bethel-Trail-9…

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GETTYSBURG, Pa.Sunbury Press has released The Death Machine, Charles K. Godfrey’s sequel to the bestsellingThe Final Charge.

About the Book:
tdm_fc
The Death Machine
is the sequel to The Final Charge, the story of Mike, Ray, and Gordon, three Civil War reenactors, who accidentally time traveled to Gettysburg in July, 1863. They took part in Pickett’s Charge and, at the end, when they made it home, they discovered they had somehow changed history.

The characters find themselves in a wonderful new world, but underneath its facade, there exists an evil that continues to grow. One of the characters is murdered, and the others risk their lives, traveling through time again to try to reset the timeline. This involves stopping a secret weapon that could foil their plans.

Excerpt:
Friday, July 3, 1863
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

It was a sultry 90-degree day. The sky rained hot metal down on the men crossing the Emmitsburg Road. Double canister tore through the Confederate rank and file every step of the way. Pickett’s Charge was in its final minutes as the Confederates dashed toward the stone wall at the area known as the Angle. In the oppressive heat of the day and the dense smoke of cannon fire, Armistead’s Confederate brigade passed through the two decimated brigades of Garnett and Kemper that were at the front.

With the stench of sulfur in their mouths and nostrils, the men of the Ninth Virginia Regiment headed for the stone wall, right where Lieutenant Cushing’s Fourth U.S. Light Artillery was located. Lieutenant Cushing had his men push the two cannons down to the stone wall to greet the oncoming Confederates. Sergeant Fuger was at his side and in the process of loading the guns when Lt. Cushing was hit in the groin by a piece of shrapnel. Lt. Cushing fell against the gun and slid to the ground, holding his wound.

Sergeant Fuger rushed to his side. “Lon, you okay?” He saw Lt. Cushing’s guts protruding from his wound and he called for the medical stewards. When the stewards got there, Cushing waved them off.

“Please, Fred, help me up,” Cushing asked.

Sergeant Fuger helped him to his feet and with the Confederates coming over the wall, Lt. Cushing grabbed his sergeant by the lapel. “Give them double canister.”

“Let ‘em have it!” Sergeant Fuger yelled.

Unbeknownst to Cushing, the gunners were killed before they could get the shots off. Seeing the bayonets coming his way, Lt. Cushing yelled, “Fire the damn–“

At that very moment, a Minié ball entered his mouth and blew out the back of his head. He fell from the sergeant’s arms to the ground, dead.

After witnessing the death of Lt. Cushing, Sergeant Fuger turned his attention to the Confederates coming over the wall. He pulled the lanyard. The discharge was devastating. Hell seemed to be cut loose on the remaining Confederates inside the Angle.

The smoke was so thick and the noise so loud that confusion gripped the battlefield. The two sides struggled and fought in deadly hand-to-hand combat. Men picked up rocks and threw them at each other. Cushing’s battery was overrun and the Confederate flags were going up over the stone wall.

Union General Webb, seeing the hole punched into the lines, put in reinforcements at the Angle and the tide soon turned. The Confederates were driven back. One by one, the men in butternut and gray were on the retreat.

The battle was over, but the carnage remained. Smoke boiled up from the battlefield along with the sickening stench of death that filled the air.

Wounded men from both sides begged for water, while the horses writhed in their death rattles. It was the true picture of butchery and death. Pickett’s Charge was over.

About the Author:
CKGodfreyCharles K. Godfrey started out in Baltimore County Fire Department as a Firefighter and was quickly promoted to Paramedic. He was promoted to Lieutenant and served the Fire Investigation unit. He retired as a Fire Lieutenant with 27 years’ service.

During this time, as a hobby, he reenacted the Civil War with the First Maryland Volunteer Infantry Regiment. For more than twenty years, he participated in the reenactments of Gettysburg, Manassas, Cedar Creek, and many others, including living history events at Fort McHenry and Harpers Ferry. He took part in the 150th ceremonies at Gettysburg.

He is a history buff that likes to blend fiction with history. In addition, he is enthusiastic about science fiction and loves the idea of time travel. He resides in northern Baltimore County with his wife of 40 years.

The Death Machine
Authored by Charles K Godfrey
List Price: $16.95
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on White paper
238 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620065754
ISBN-10: 1620065754
BISAC: Fiction / Historical

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-Death-Machine-978162…

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MECHANICSBURG, Pa. — Sunbury Press has released C. James Gilbert’s second novel “A Darker Shade of Freedom.”

adsof_fcAbout the Book:

The sequel to “A Deeper Sense of Loyalty”…

When the Confederate States of America was defeated in 1865, the masses of oppressed and impoverished blacks were freed; that is to say that the practice of slavery was forever outlawed by the U.S. Constitution. But James Langdon of Macon, Georgia knew before the war ended that it would be a very long time before the black race would be accepted as social equals.

Having seen a slave beaten for trying to escape from his father’s plantation, James was then, there and forevermore pitted against the evils of bigotry. However, in the immediate years after the war; an enemy, a most formidable foe was born in Nashville, Tennessee and was called the Ku Klux Klan.

To ignite the inferno which would rage between Langdon Plantation and the Klan, a secret that only James’s wife, parents, and sisters knew about became public knowledge. Once the secret was revealed the conflict began; a very devastating conflict.

adsol_pubA true believer in God’s will, James joins forces with his black neighbors to stand against tyranny and those who would try to exercise power over them. He would never be satisfied until America recognized all Americans as equal; both black and white.

A Darker Shade of Freedom

Authored by C. James Gilbert

List Price: $16.95
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on White paper
280 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620063859
ISBN-10: 1620063859
BISAC: Fiction / Historical
Soon to be available on Kindle and Nook

For more information, please see:

http://www.sunburypressstore.com/A-Darker-Shade-of-Freedo…

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