Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for September, 2014

by Barbara Matthews

gh_fcThe doorbell rang…” and in through that doorway Sharon Marchisello issues forth one bombshell after another in her contemporary murder mystery, Going Home.

Michelle DePalma arrives at her mother’s home to find that the door is uncharacteristically wide open. Upon entering, she finds a young woman dead on the floor with her mother hovering nearby—seemingly unaware of what has taken place in the foyer of her home.

As Marchisello weaves her intricate tale, the doorway introduces:

  • Unknown family: “I’m Isabella Rogers, and this is my daughter, Giovanna. I’m your daughter-in-law.”
  • A policeman: “Michelle, I’m afraid the evidence is pointing to your mother.”
  • A man with a raised baseball bat: “Where’s that crazy old broad that killed my Brittany?”
  • A potential suspect who appears in: “The same vehicle I had passed on my way up the street the day I arrived, the day Brittany had died!”

Going Home draws attention to specific issues of Alzheimer’s disease as well as caregiving problems in general:

  • wandering;
  • long-distance caregiving;
  • finding reliable caregiving agencies and personnel;
  • financial exploitation;
  • sibling relationships / shared responsibility; and
  • the difficulties of facing death and dying

wtdam_fcAlthough Going Home addresses important caregiving issues, it does so in a manner that will intrigue a wide-variety of readers. I recommend it highly.

Barbara Matthews is the co-author of What to Do About Mama?: A Guide to Caring for Aging Family Members

Going Home

 Authored by Sharon Marchisello
List Price: $16.95
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on White paper
284 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620064382
ISBN-10: 1620064383
BISAC: Fiction / Mystery & Detective / General
For more information, please see: http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Going-Home-9781620064382.htm
Advertisements

Read Full Post »

by S. H. Marchisello

wtdam_fcI wish a book like What to Do about Mama? had been available in 2000 when my mother was suffering from Alzheimer’s, or even a decade later, when we faced the same issues with my mother-in-law. Because America’s population is aging and more and more baby boomers—“the sandwich generation”—are being thrust into caregiving roles, this book is very timely and reassures you that you are not alone. Seeking help is not a weakness; it may be necessary to retain your sanity.

In What to Do about Mama? we hear about the very different experiences of the co-authors, as well as testimonials from numerous other caregivers:

  • Barbara Matthews cared for her mother-in-law in her home for four years. She felt like the warm relationship she’d had with her in-laws deteriorated during the process, due to criticism, second-guessing, and an unwillingness to share the burden to the level expected.
  • Barbara Trainin Blank cared for her mother at a distance for about two years. Because her mother had Alzheimer’s, she had to hire full-time aides and manage the caregiving from afar.
  • The majority of the testimonials from interviewees dealt with the care of a parent, although some of the people provided care for spouses, children, and other relatives.
  • The testimonials covered experiences with home care, long distance care, nursing home and hospice care, as well as assisted living arrangements.

Some of the people had good experiences; for others, caregiving became a nightmare. Some had siblings and other relatives who were supportive; others bore the burden alone. Some families grew closer; others were driven apart. For some, the care period was only for a few months, for others, the arrangement lasted years. But the almost universal consensus was that caregiving is hard and unpredictable. Even those who had previous experience in the medical field and elder care were hit with surprises.

What to Do about Mama? is divided into 10 chapters that discuss different aspects of caregiving. Snippets of the stories, which appear elsewhere in the book in their entirety, are interspersed where appropriate to drive home a point. Each story illustrates an important caregiving theme.

gh_fcIn my mystery novel, Going Home, I only show a small slice of the caregiving experience as the drama unfolds. What to Do about Mama? hits you with the hard reality.

Highly recommended for anyone who might someday assume a caregiving role. Read it before you need it, and then keep it around for reference!

Sharon Marchisello is the author of Going Home, a murder mystery about an elderly woman who allegedly kills her caretaker.

What to Do about Mama?: A Guide to Caring for Aging Family Members

 Authored by Barbara G. Matthews, Authored by Barbara Trainin Blank
List Price: $19.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on White paper
230 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620063156
ISBN-10: 1620063158
BISAC: Family & Relationships / Eldercare
For more information, please see: http://www.sunburypressstore.com/What-to-Do-about-Mama-9781620063156.htm

Read Full Post »

September 25, 2014 – Hollywood, California

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAs an Emmy winning film editor, Neil Mandelberg has been a respected member of the entertainment industry for over 20 years. He has been involved in many landmark industry series and movies such as Medium, Equal Justice, The Temptations mini-series, for which he received an Emmy nomination, and the ground-breaking series Moonlighting, for which he won 2 Emmys. Neil was also lead editor on 134 episodes of the CBS drama, Ghost Whisperer to name only a few.

Chosen by Intergalaxy Entertainment, President James L. Perry out of a field of over a dozen of Hollywood’s best American Cinema Editors, Mandelberg won the coveted position on the basis of his extensive story editorial skills in both prime-time television, feature films and documentaries.

The Cursed Man movie is a psychological thriller/horror film produced and directed by Perry, based on the novel by Keith Rommel, published by Sunbury Press, Inc. of Mechanicsburg, PA.  The screenplay was written by Rommel and Perry.

Pictured below is the Duppy monster, In Jamaican folklore the creature is a malicious spirit of the dead.

Duppy

Read Full Post »

LAREDO, TexasSunbury Press has released Robert Joe Stout’s latest book Hidden Dangers: Mexico on the Brink of Disaster.

hd_fcAbout the Book:
Mexico is undergoing economic and political changes that lie like landmines ready to explode beneath Uncle Sam’s footsteps.

By the close of the first decade of the twenty-first century Mexico-United States relations had begun to shred. The leaders of the two countries shared a master-servant façade of cooperation and commitment but faced eroding control of the economy, the flourishing drug trade and human rights issues. Despite the propaganda to the contrary every year millions of Mexicans sank into poverty, their lands expropriated and the prices of basic necessities soaring. ICE agents swept through factories, farms and construction sites from Maine to California herding handcuffed “illegals” into detention facilities. Both countries ignored human rights violations and corruption in order to maintain control over Mexico’s pro-neoliberal administration. Violence associated with the “War on Drugs” took over 70,000 lives without materially diminished the U.S. market for cocaine, marijuana and designer drugs. Brutal repression of citizen protest provoked ongoing international criticism and alienated millions of Mexican citizens. The country’s dependence on oil exports to finance social programs pressured the state-controlled monopoly to cut corners, creating pipeline leaks and other environmental disasters.

Hidden Dangers focuses on the period 2000-2010 and pinpoints five major “landmines” that seriously threaten both countries social and political structures. It includes first-hand observations of devaluations, political repressions and border conflicts and commentaries and analyses from officials and academics on both sides of the frontier. The five principal sections investigate migration and its effects on both Mexico and the United States, the drug trade’s influence on the economies and politics of both countries, popular uprisings that challenge U.S. influence and neo-liberal politics, how Mexico’s deeply rooted “politics of corruption” binds the entrepreneurial and banking systems to government processes and environmental disasters, both real and in the making, created by the oil, lumber and cattle industries, toxic waste, floods and poisoned waterways.

Excerpt:
Former New York Times Mexico bureau chief, Alan Riding, entitled his 1985 best seller Our Distant Neighbors. Nearly a generation has passed since that writing, and the two countries remain as close—and as distant—as they were then. Mexico and the United States share a border that stretches for nearly 2,000 miles between the Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. Deeply ingrained ethnic, economic, and political differences have escalated to the point that armed military forces have been deployed along the border by the leaders of both nations, some to combat a common enemy—the drug corporations—others to restrict immigration, smuggling, and money laundering.

Distant or not, Mexico is undergoing economic and political changes that lie like landmines ready to explode beneath the troubled and often discordant impulses of the two countries to satisfy their divergent social and political needs. These landmines include:

Migration, legal and illegal, exacerbated by profound differences in earnings in the two countries and economic crises in both, a rapidly expanding labor pool and more aggressive deportation procedures on the part of U.S. Homeland Security;

Intrusion by drug organizations into economic and political activities that include assassinations, payoffs, and escalating drug use in Mexico itself;

Grass roots political movements opposed to globalization, centralized government, and unequal distribution of wealth that are being repressed, often violently, by Mexican political forces;

Government and entrepreneurial corruption, including the failure to invest oil profits in infrastructure, debilitating the industry and putting most of the country’s wealth in the hands of a few politically connected individuals;

Environmental disasters and the collapse of self-sustaining agriculture that have created wastelands, polluted major waterways, and triggered rural-to-urban migrations.

About the Author:
As a journalist working in areas with large Spanish-speaking populations, Bob Stout has written about Mexico and its problems and accomplishments. These reports and observations have appeared inAmerica, Commonweal,Notre Dame Magazine and The Christian Science Monitor, among many other publications, and in The Blood of the Serpent: Mexican Lives which was published in 2003 and in Why Immigrants Come to America: Braceros, Indocumentados and the Migra published in 2008.

A graduate of the Universidad de las Americas and long-time newspaper and magazine journalist Stout has lived and worked in California, Texas, New Orleans and Washington, D.C. and in Mexico, Europe and Central America. His books include two novels, a recently published volume of poetry and dozens of literary and commercial magazine shortstories. He currently lives in Oaxaca in southern Mexico.

Hidden Dangers: Mexico on the Brink of Disaster
Authored by Robert Joe Stout
List Price: $16.95
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on White paper
216 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620064887
ISBN-10: 162006488X
BISAC: Political Science / World / Caribbean & Latin American

Coming soon on Kindle
For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Hidden-Dangers-978162006…

Read Full Post »

by Emma Crosby

2012-12-11_ebookThere’s no denying the power of a good book, whether it’s in traditional print or digital format, and new tales are constantly being woven that continue to make the move to the big and little screens. However, the initial boom of eBooks looks to be coming to an end, with eBook sales taking a severe hit in recent years. This has caused some large print retailers, such as Waterstones in the UK, to claim that the print form is set to make a comeback. Whether the digital marketplace really is dead for books could be more complicated than it seems, and there are a number of reasons that could account for the lull in popularity over the last few years. The fact is that the written word is becoming increasingly digital, whether it appears in the form of creative literary works or marketing material, with ever increasing access to mobile internet and portable digital devices, we are all far more likely to be reading from digital sources. It could be the latest book in the Game of Thrones series, or some content produced by web copywriting agencies, and it perhaps this ongoing reliance and preference for the digital format that makes the drop in eBook sales so puzzling.

 

eBook Facts and Trends

nookbutton3In order to put things in perspective, it’s perhaps important to remember that eBooks have been through a bad patch before. Since their initial appearance in the late 1990s, eBooks were initially slow to be accepted. While a few big name authors, such as Stephen King, were quick to embrace the new format, technology limitations at the time made reading an eBook a generally unpleasant experience, with many of the early devices developed exclusively for eBooks causing eye strain and headaches as a result of bright screens and poor letter visibility. However, as the technology became better, the demand increased. The release of the first Amazon Kindles met with great success, and spurned on a huge growth in eBook sales. Understandably, a number of publishers were quick to get involved as well, leading to eBooks being distributed by a number of major publishing houses and book retailers. Furthermore, the Apple iPad, and accompanying tablets that hit the market, helped to increase the popularity and convenience of eBooks even more.

 

Two Sides of the Coin

kindle-img.1While there is concern over the recent plummet in sales figures, it’s not necessarily all bad news. To begin with, many thought that the previous triple figure growth was not sustainable, and bound to come to an end sooner or later. Additionally, many in the sector see the slow down as a good sign, or at the very least a mixed blessing to some extent. The slow down in eBooks sales has for example, also slowed down the decline of print sales, which is good news for both traditional book shops and publishers heavily invested in print. Additionally, a large proportion of the growth last year is thought to be down to big blockbuster books, such as Fifty Shades of Grey, and The Hunger Games. There were no titles that claimed this level of popularity in the intervening time period. Secondly, while tablet sales have been going through the roof, research has shown that tablet users are much less likely to buy eBooks than those that purchase dedicated eBook readers, such as the Kindle. Analysts also point to the fact that everyone in the industry is likely to be much happier with a more stable, cross format marketplace in the future, and that eBook sales are likely to remain much lower than before for a few more years. That said, it certainly looks like the eBook isn’t going anywhere anytime soon, and will simply be another possible choice for the reader. Finally, the fact that just over 30% of all eBook revenue was generated by indie and self publishing authors is a sign that the eBook will certainly continue to be a favourite platform for writers to showcase and sell their work. Overall then, while the sudden drop in sales may be a shock, it doesn’t necessarily translate into bad news for the eBook, or the book world in general. In fact, we are likely to see not only a return to print in the future, but a much more stable marketplace in general, while eBooks continue to be a great platform for up and coming writers.

Read Full Post »

NEW YORKSunbury Press has released Matthew Taub’s first novel Death of the Dying City about the gentirification of New York City in the 1990s.

KUH1989002K655About the Book:
DEATH OF THE DYING CITY is a panorama of New York City’s rapid gentrification and shifting cultural enclaves in the 1990s. Rotating character-driven vignettes are connected by Mark Newstein, a young ethically-imperiled attorney facing additional issues of romantic upheaval.

Excerpt:
It was a rather mundane, almost formulaic way to bring a crushing end to a career, Mark Newstein thought as he waited for his ethics committee hearing to begin. Yet despite this cynical, disengaged assessment, Mark remained paralyzed by fear. He could feel his heart pounding in his chest, every seemingly innocuous sight and sound—of workers gossiping while coming back from their coffee break, or the receptionist’s banter with a postal worker delivering a package—putting him further on edge. Mark was excitably unhinged, but also extremely fatigued—he hadn’t slept properly in several days. He tried to focus on anticipating the questions he would soon face. The committee would surely be asking him about his conduct and the questionable conduct of other members of his workplace over the past few years. It wasn’t every day that a law office boasting multi-million dollar profits, closely affiliated with another highly-visible firm advertising a catchy “1-800” number on every subway car, television channel, billboard, and radio station throughout the metropolitan area suddenly ceased to exist. The committee would want to know why.

Until they called him, the front reception area of Departmental Disciplinary Committee (“DDC”) was where Mark was forced to wait. This Downtown office was a fitting, funereal accompaniment for his demise: lights dimmed too low, blotched stains peppering a shabby carpet, lumpy couches, faded magazines, and a neglected potted plant wilting in the corner. The building itself was of faded stonework, sturdy but otherwise unremarkable. Manhattan’s own Ten Downing Street, this nondescript appearance belied the office’s enormous stature and power. When lawyers are first licensed to practice law, they are approved by a separate committee on Character & Fitness; the DDC was its own distinct entity that, depending on the circumstances, could later find that character to be sorely lacking. The committee had the power to reprimand, censure, sanction, suspend, and even disbar lawyers deemed unfit to continue practicing law. Mark Newstein was their next case to review.

Mark presented himself that morning in proper business attire, but otherwise was completely disheveled—unshaven cheeks brimming with prickly stubble, his auburn hair a shaggy mess, posture edgy, movements discombobulated. Hand gestures twitched with nervousness. The static silence of the waiting room provided little solace. He couldn’t bear to read any of the stale literature while he waited; instead, Mark simply began to reflect on his seemingly short-lived career. A young man at the end of his twenties, he had only practiced for a short period before it all came tumbling down. Shrewd and savvy enough to do well in his industry, he still knew well the ethical boundaries he never wanted to cross, regardless of whether there were repercussions. It was therefore with particular irony, and utter disbelief, that he marveled at the circumstances in which he found himself. The truth was that his fervent commitment to honesty and integrity, rather than saving him from this place, had only ushered him here more quickly.

Asforhisprivatelife,his“relationship”withStephanie, if that was even a proper title, seemed to be approaching its inevitable, crushing finality.Howlonghad itbeensince she stopped returninghiscalls?A partofhim alwaysknewthey weredoomed, but it was torture to think of her reluctant engagement to the man of her mother’s insistence. It all seemed so laughably antiquated for their modern times, yet too real to chuckle away. He thought of the mother, that bossy cow, and her obscene desire for that smiling moron. Mark kicked himself for being so poor a judge of character.

And then there was the city itself, permanently deranged. In the mere half decade Mark worked as a lawyer, the Big Apple was dragged, kicking and screaming, from its former destitute dereliction to present-day, gleaming modernity. While briefly achieving a pleasant homeostasis—that sought-after nexus between ghastly grit and sanitized sedation—it didn’t last. As ever more sprawling middle class and creative havens were reimagined as high-end locales, the new world priced itself out, made unaffordable as quickly as it became accessible, wiped clean of any character and instead morphed into a tourist’s playground, a cartoonish and corporate viewing spectacle. The ephemeral places and faces Mark knew were dying out, knocked over as they were like dominoes. As the dynamic metropolis he knew and loved came to an end, it seemed Mark would follow right along in it.

KUH1989002K655About the Author:
Matthew A. Taub is a lawyer, fiction writer, and occasional journalist living in Brooklyn, NY. His work has appeared in Absinthe Revival, The Weekenders, Red Ochre LiT’s BLACK&WHITE Magazine, The Squawk Back, Schlock Magazine, Foliate Oak Literary Magazine, The Fat City Review, Raw Fiction, The Brooklyn Daily Eagle,Greenpointers and Only the Blog Knows Brooklyn.Est. 250 pages

DEATH OF THE DYING CITY is his first novel. Though a work of fiction, the work grew out of the author’s fascination with the traumatic history of New York City’s emergence from the doldrums, and his witnessing truly vexing issues involving the ugly underbelly to the legal profession and wanting more— more from the justice system, and more from the individuals who make a living within it.

Inspiration for the literary style and themes of the novel came many prior works, including Richard Price’s ”Lush Life,” Tom Wolfe’s ”Bonfire of the Vanities,” and Jonathan Lethem’s ”The Fortress of Solitude.”

What Others Are Saying:
“Riveting stuff.”
— Joshua Baldwin, author of The Wilshire Sun

“A compelling mosaic of threatened artistic subcultures and boiling racial tensions in a city on the fast-track for change.”
— Andrew Cotto, author of Outerborough Blues

Death of the Dying City
Authored by Matthew Taub
List Price: $19.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on White paper
336 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620063552
ISBN-10: 1620063557
BISAC: Fiction / Legal

Also available on Kindle
For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Death-of-the-Dying-City-…

Read Full Post »

MECHANICSBURG, Pa.Sunbury Press has released the bestsellers list for August, 2014. Jim Remsen’s young adult novel Visions of Teaoga was #1.

About Visions of Teaoga
vot_fcThe year is 1790 and Queen Esther, a notorious American Indian matriarch, travels under cover to observe a U.S.-Iroquois summit at the ancient Teaoga treaty grounds. Will she be able to pass on her wisdom – and warnings – to the Indian villagers before the hostile settlers discover her in their midst? Will troubled native girl Sisketung awaken to Esther’s truths and see how wrong-headed the brash settler girl Sarah was?

Moving two centuries forward, restless tweener Maddy Winter also visits Teaoga, now a quiet riverfront town on the Pennsylvania-New York border. She tunes in to the region’s dramatic lost history and soon encounters spirits in the wind. As she gains in wisdom, Maddy longs to take on Esther’s mantle of the “peace woman,” but will she find the courage to do right in her own life?

Drawing richly from the historical record, Visions of Teaogacaptures a world in upheaval. Readers sit at a native story circle and learn of the tensions and treachery besetting the Eastern frontier. As Maddy and her modern-day compatriots enter the story, they ponder how our history was recorded and by whom. The book is a perfect companion for middle-school history classes, with discussion questions and other supplemental materials provided on the author’s website, www.jimremsen.com.

SUNBURY PRESS – Bestsellers for August, 2014 (by Revenue)
Rank Last Month Title Author Category
1 NEW Visions of Teaoga Jim Remsen YA Fiction
2 The Piano Bed Anne Marie Drew YA Fiction
3 Remember the Sun Melanie Simms Poetry
4 NEW Going Home Susan Marchisello Thriller Fiction
5 What to Do about Mama? Matthews & Blank Self-Help
6 14 Pit Bulls Anthony Julian History
7 NEW Petrified Tanya Reimer YA Fiction
8 12 Jesus the Phoenician Karim El Koussa History
9 Shadows in the Shining City John Cressler Historical Fiction
10 6 Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last Mike Campbell History
11 5 The Closer Alan Mindell Sports Fiction
12 Pythagoras Karim El Koussa Historical Fiction
13 The Phoenician Code Karim El Koussa Action Adventure
14 NEW The Voice in my Ear Ken Newman Action Adventure
15 NEW Dying for Vengeance J . M. West Thriller Fiction
16 The Sign of the Eagle Jess Steven Hughes Historical Fiction
17 Pit Bulls II Anthony Julian History
18 Fatal Snow Robert Walton Action Adventure
19 1 The Cursed Man Keith Rommel Thriller Fiction
20 4 The Lurking Man Keith Rommel Thriller Fiction

dfv_fcSunbury Press closed out its best August ever. Sales more than doubled last year’s August. Year-to-Date, sales are up nearly 15%. Trade paperbacks led the way with a 20% year-to-date gain. Ebooks are down over 20% year-over-year. Hardcovers, reintroduced by the company in June, were nearly double eBook sales in August. Since June, hardcover sales have caught up to eBook sales. There is a clear trend for readers preferring print over digital platforms. Nook content sales fell over 50% in August. Is the end near?

Jim Remsen’s Visions of Teaga was boosted by author activities. Anne Marie Drew’s The Piano Bed was helped by author activities and an Amazon promotion. The poetry book about Sunbury, Remember the Sun, by Melanie Simms charted high thanks to author radio appearances. Sharon Marchisello’s Going Home grabbed the clean-up spot due to author activities. What to Do about Mama by “The Barbs” returned to the list buoyed by their recent network TV appearance. Anthony Julian’s Pit Bulls III continued to draw interest among dog enthusiasts. Tanya Reimer’s Petrified performed very well thanks to interest in Canada and feedback concerning the cover design. Karim El Koussa had a hat trick with Jesus the Phoenician, Pythagoas, and The Phoenician Code all charting thanks to an export order to Lebanon. John Cressler’s Shadows in the Shining City returned to the list due to anticipation about his appearance at the Decatur Book Festival. Mike Campbell’s Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last held at #11 due to advance orders for his appearance before the 99’s in Wichita, Kansas. Alan Mindell’s The Closer stayed on the chart thanks to sales in the San Diego area. Ken Newman’s The Voice in My Ear was helped by author activities. J. M. West’s Dying for Vengeance charted despite only a couple days on sale due to interest in the Carlisle, PA area. Jess Steven Hughes’ The Sign of the Eagle returned to the rankings as a result of author bookstore appearances. Robert Walton’s Fatal Snow was helped by sales at Bob’s Bagels. Keith Rommel’s The Cursed Man & The Lurking Man clung to the last two spots due to sales at Rocky’s Ace Hardware.

The company released eight new titles during the month of August:

SUNBURY PRESS – New Releases for August, 2014
Petrified Tanya Reimer YA Fiction
A Pale Horse & 40 Other Tales Joe Tarone Short Stories
Visions of Teaoga Jim Remsen YA Fiction
Going Home Susan Marchisello Thriller Fiction
How I Got Into Hollywood Rommel & Knorr Self-Help
The Voice in my Ear Ken Newman Action Adventure
Dying for Vengeance J . M. West Thriller Fiction
The Ghost Sisters and the Girl in Hallway B Patricia Marcantonio YA Fiction

For a list of Sunbury’s best-sellers, please see the Sunbury Press web site:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/BESTSELLERS_c3.htm
For a complete list of recent and upcoming releases, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/COMING-SOON_c47.htm

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »