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VENICE, Fla.Sunbury Press has released Charlie Caw, Paul Argentini’s latest novel, for middle grade and young adults.

cc_fcAbout the Book:
A crow that picks wildflowers and delivers them to show affection, and a fatherless boy who teaches the bird how to fly create a heartwarming story of these two disparate beings going and growing with one another. Their deep and abiding companionship keeps them close, yet they remain free to maintain all their relationships. Each protects the other in awkward situations, but they respect one another to allow the freedom to make individual choices. They confront humorous and dangerous situations with daring spirit learning a bit more of the other’s world with each confrontation. CHARLIE CAW is such a likeable story one can only believe it is true. It will find a niche in your memory for a long, long time.

Excerpt:
Charlie Partridge caught at his breath with the firing squad’s volley. His body tensed. He expected the bullets to tear through his clothes and into his flesh. He felt as if they already had.

It was the nightmare. Again.

The panorama of the cemetery flashed into his mind. There was the October mackerel sky and the flag-draped casket suspended over the blackness. Standing were dozens of people wearing mask-like faces. As he had never seen her, there was his mother sitting under the canopy: her face white and drawn, her eyes glowing briquettes, her lips held tight to a slash. There was the bass-drum monotone of the minister uttering profundities. There was the cadre of officers and the honor guard who had escorted the fallen decorated hero to this country gravesite with its majesty of flowers. There was the formal precision of the military funeral. These ceremonies were for his father, Lt. James Partridge, but he hoped they had made a mistake and it really was someone else.

More volleys followed.

Charlie wondered if such a barrage had also resounded before the hero had died. He wondered if he, too, had smelled the acrid smoke from burning gunpowder.

Charlie watched the haze settle softly among the blades of dew-damp grass. Then, closing his eyes, he saw himself start to fall as if into an abyss of reverie: it was dawn. His father whistled, as usual, as he slipped into his bedroom to wake him. As they had done so many times before, father, mother, and son grabbed a quick breakfast and the fishing gear, then the three of them were off. Shortly thereafter, he stood shivering in the gurgle and splash of the spring-fed brook where the bespeckled trout hid.

Charlie opened his eyes. A stern-faced officer bowed before Charlie’s mother. He offered her the triangularly-folded American flag. With yet another rush of tears, she took it and clutched it to her breast. Without straightening, the officer turned to Charlie seated beside her, and their eyes locked. As if taking part in a conspiracy, he signaled Charlie with a slight nod.

He watched the officer perform an agonizingly slow salute to his mother and to the flag. Charlie felt the wet at the small of his back turn cold. Then, the officer beckoned with his fingers and nodded, indicating Charlie was to follow him. Charlie stood. They walked to the far end of the headstone-studded field.

“We need to talk,” the officer said to Charlie.

Charlie stared at his medals, then at the man’s chest. “Your shirt is stained, sir,” Charlie said.

“I apologize if it troubles you,” he said pointing, “but this is a blood stain from the wound that earned me the Silver Star Medal and took my life. That’s what happened to your father,” the officer responded. “Only those who have been wounded in battle may have the honor of participating in the ceremonies for a fallen comrade. It is my privilege and honor to be here.” The officer turned toward the knot of people surrounding the open grave, then asked, “Were you and your dad close, Charlie?”

Charlie raised his eyebrows and looked up at the man, nodding his head for several seconds, then said, “Sir, I must go home. Now.”

“Sorry, son,” he said. “To leave this cemetery, you need to be brave; you need to be courageous and you need to be strong. You must allow yourself to cry. You must accept what has happened. This funeral will go on until you accept the fact that your dad is not coming back. When you acknowledge that, then this funeral will end.”

“Everything was so sudden,” Charlie said.

The officer put his hand on Charlie’s shoulder and said, “You can only deny this for so long.” The soldier’s face grew even more somber as he folded his arms and continued, “Time is another problem. When is your next birthday?”

“June sixteenth. I’ll be fourteen.”

“Fourteen! Is that so? You seem older. The fact is, your next birthday, that’s your deadline.”

“Deadline?” Charlie flexed his eyebrows. “Why a deadline?”

The officer shrugged. “Son, many brave men and women fall in battle. Each one deserves to be commemorated, such as we are doing now for your dad. But, we only have so much time for each funeral, or we’d fall way behind. We want to serve everyone their full measure of respect. Once you acknowledge that it is your father’s funeral, you will be through with the formalities, the grieving, and with us here at the cemetery. It will allow us to move on with our work, and you can get on with your life.”

“Thank you, Sir”, Charlie said. “All I know is that something important has changed in my life. It’s so confusing, and I don’t understand any of it.”

“I regret to say understanding will come with time. Meanwhile, it’s like getting measles, you just have to work through it,” the officer said. “The apparitions and demons must be worse.”

Charlie felt the muscles in his face tighten. “Yes, they’re just awful. They’re frightening.” He pulled his shoulders back and said, “Mother’s alone. I must go.” He turned and marched with the officer back to the ceremony.

The brittle, dredging notes of the bugler’s taps consumed the air as if to suffocate Charlie.

He found his arms tight around his mother with his face buried in the folded flag, her spasms pulsating through and shaking his body for an endless moment. Then, taking his mother’s lead, he tried to place the rose he found in his hand on the imposing coffin. He could not let go of the stem – it stuck to his fingers! Shake as hard as he could, the flower still clung to him, and he felt it draw him into the void beneath the casket.

Charlie Caw
Authored by Paul Argentini
List Price: $24.95
Hardcover: 154 pages
Publisher: Sunbury Press, Inc. (April 23, 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1620065851
ISBN-13: 978-1620065853
Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.4 x 9 inches
Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
BISAC: Fiction / Young Adult / Relationships

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Charlie-Caw-978162006585…

HARRISBURG, Pa.Sunbury Press has released Capital Murder: An investigative reporter’s hunt for answers in a collapsing city, Chris Papst’s expose of the recent financial troubles in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, the state capital.

cm_fcAbout the Book:
Every city in America is unique. Each has its own instructive tale of success and failure. What makes Harrisburg, Pennsylvania’s story most valuable lies not in its life but in its death – and in the actions of those who killed it.

In late 2011, Harrisburg became the first – and only – capital city in American history to file for bankruptcy. For four years, investigative reporter Chris Papst provided award-winning coverage of this unprecedented financial collapse. Now, he has authored a book sharing his experiences while detailing what went wrong.

Excerpt:
In two-and-a-half years, I filed more than 200 reports on Harrisburg’s financial collapse and the hapless residents it affected. Nearly every day something news-worthy happened—and little of it good.

Yet, despite my built-in safeguards, the abhorrent nature of Harrisburg’s demise eventually wore on my psyche. After hundreds of depressing reports, day-after-day, I started to break. This was where I worked. This was my home state’s capital city. I had friends who lived and raised families here. I wanted Harrisburg to win. But it seemed impossible.

People were made massively wealthy issuing the bond deals that capsized Harrisburg. But every day at 4:00, I watched as the protagonists whoallowed it to happen hopped in their foreign sports sedans and fled town. They left behind a broke and broken city, and not one person was heldaccountable. No arrests. No charges.No indictments. No restitution. The city was financially dead, but apparently no one killed it.

For the longest time, I couldn’t understand how a city could have been so financially raped. How could the residents allow it to happen? More importantly, how could the media allow it to happen? In a democracy, where everyone has the right to free speech, and the right to assemble and petition, how is this possible? It took me years to truly understand. And once I finally did, I found it necessary to write this book.  — Chris Papst

bio_1About the Author
Chris Papst
is a multiple Emmy-award winning investigative reporter whose work has initiated changes in law and sparked criminal investigations. He currently works at ABC 7/WJLA in Washington, DC.

Capital Murder
Authored by Chris Papst
List Price: $29.95
Hardcover: 244 pages
Publisher: Sunbury Press, Inc. (April 22, 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1620065916
ISBN-13: 978-1620065914
Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 9 inches
Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
BISAC: Government / State & Local / Pennsylvania

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Capital-Murder-978162006…. (http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-B-Team-9781620065952…)

kstsph_fcPHILADELPHIASunbury Press has released Keystone Tombstones Philadelphia Region by Joe Farrell and Joe Farley.

About the Book:
Biographies of famous people buried in the Philadelphia Region are the focus of this first localized edition of the Keystone Tombstones. Farrell and Farley have combed the Philadelphia area to bring you the most entertaining tales about interesting people buried in Pennsylvania. Included in this volume:

Bucks County

  • Pearl Buck
  • Saint Katherine Drexel
  • Tom Gola

Chester County

  • Smedley Butler
  • Jim Croce

Delaware County

  • Marian Anderson
  • Paul Arizin
  • John McDermott
  • Herman Webster Mudgett aka Dr. Henry H. Holmes
  • Danny Murtaugh
  • Philadelphia Sinners
  • Bessie Smith
  • Anthony Wayne

Montgomery County

  • Alan Ameche
  • Richie Ashburn
  • Lafayette C. Baker
  • De Bonneville “Bert” Bell
  • Jay Cooke
  • Dave Garroway
  • Winfield Scott Hancock
  • John Hartranft
  • Herman Haupt
  • Teddy Pendergrass
  • Arlen Specter
  • Grover Washington Jr.
  • Harry Wright
  • Samuel K. Zook

Philadelphia County

  • William (Willie) Law Anderson
  • John Barrymore
  • Ulric Dahlgren
  • Four Founders
  • Samuel W. Crawford
  • Benjamin Franklin
  • Joe Frazier
  • General Controversy
  • Franklin Gowen
  • Harry Norbert Kalas
  • Oliver B. Knowles
  • Connie Mack
  • George Meade
  • Robert Morris & James Wilson
  • St. Clair Augustine Mulholland
  • Saint John Newman
  • Dennis O’Kane
  • John C. Pemberton
  • Galusha Pennypacker
  • Frank Rizzo
  • Bill Tilden
  • John Wanamaker

Keystone Tombstones Philadelphia Region: Biographies of Famous People Buried in Pennsylvania
Authored by Joe Farrell, Authored by Joe Farley, Authored by Lawrence Knorr
List Price: $19.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on White paper
360 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620065457
ISBN-10: 1620065452
BISAC: Biography & Autobiography / Rich & Famous

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Keystone-Tombstones-Phil…

HARRISBURG, Pa.Sunbury Press has released Along the Bethel Trail: The Journey of an African American Faith Community presented by Friends of the Bethel Trail.

About the Book:

Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church of Harrisburg, 1835 – 2015

atbt_fc smThroughout its history, the Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church of Harrisburg has been a critical link in the chain of places, people, and events that bind and strengthen Pennsylvania’s quest for equity, parity, and social justice. Along the Bethel Trail is an anthology of articles by area authors, scholars and humanists that guides readers through the history of this resilient congregation in relationship to the legacy and impact on the community that it serves. Each contributing author writes of a specific historical period and geographic site where the church was located. From that vantage point, the authors explore the social and civic engagement of the congregation and its leadership in time and place, as the church and surrounding communities were continuously uprooted to make room for the expanding state capitol complex. Together their articles frame the impact of the church and congregation on the development of Harrisburg’s diverse community. The combined articles also articulate the struggle of Harrisburg’s African-American community for economic development, sustainability, and a sense of place over the past 180 years.

The anthology of articles supports the eight paneled interpretive signage and self-guided experience along Harrisburg’s Bethel Trail. Discover the location of Bethel’s first church at the current Amtrak station, key 19thcentury sites at Harrisburg’s Forum, Fountain, and Justice buildings along Commonwealth Ave, its 20th century site at 6th and Herr and Bethel’s current 21st century home in midtowns at 1721 N.5th street.

Along the Bethel Trail: The Journey of an African American Faith Community
Authored by Lenwood O. Sloan, Nancy Mendes, and Michael L. Barton
List Price: $29.95
Hardcover: 60 pages
Publisher: Sunbury Press, Inc. (April 15, 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 162006586X
ISBN-13: 978-1620065860
Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 0.3 x 11 inches
Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
BISAC: History / African American

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Along-the-Bethel-Trail-9…

WAUSAU, Wis.Sunbury Press has released The Fossils of Blackberry Hill: Solving the Mystery of the First Animals on Land, by Kenneth Gass.

tfobbh_fcAbout the Book:
The Fossils of Blackberry Hill: Solving the Mystery of the First Animals on Land is the first book to cover the unique group of rock outcrops in Central Wisconsin that appears to have put an end to a one-hundred-fifty-year-old mystery of global interest. Since the mid-eighteen-hundreds, fossilized footprints and trackways have been found on beach deposits in what is now North America that dated back to the Cambrian Period, some five hundred million years ago – but fossils of the animals that made them avoided detection all that time. Thanks to Blackberry Hill, the identity of some of the first animals to walk on land is a secret no more. Numerous color photographs of spectacularly preserved tidal flat trackways, animals, and parts of the habitat itself, all frozen in stone, help to tell the story of some of the first animals to explore this strange, new environment. Current interpretations made possible by the fossil discoveries are presented, including how some of the trackways were made and what might have lured the animals ashore. Peculiar, winding trackways from giant, slug-like organisms and other boneless animals are shown covering entire surfaces. This book also shows other surprises revealed at Blackberry Hill, including body and trace fossils of another tidal flat dweller never before found in rocks as old as these, and the first occurrence to show that large jellyfish were abundant in Cambrian times and were already subject to mass strandings. In this book, Kenneth Gass thus demonstrates why Blackberry Hill holds its special place in the history of life on Earth.

What Others Are Saying:
“A mystery revealed, The Fossils of Blackberry Hill  charmingly tells the story of how clever scientific detective work has answered the question of what those first animals to visit the subaerial environments of our world really were—however fleeting their visits from their ancient ocean habitats may have been. Engagingly told by Chris Gass, one of the key participants, the story reveals the importance of a highly special area that holds the fossilized evidence that shows what really happened … ” – Niles Eldredge, evolutionary biologist, author

“The early history of life on land is a conundrum that has perplexed some of the foremost figures in the history of paleontology since the era of Richard Owen and Charles Darwin over 150 years ago. At center stage in this mystery are trackways on sedimentary rocks that we now know are of Cambrian age – some 500 million years old – and were made by animals making the first excursions out of water in life’s history. In The Fossils of Blackberry Hill, Chris Gass weaves together the history of science and groundbreaking research conducted over the past 20 years to reveal the identities of these ancient trace makers. His book is a scientific detective story in words and photographs.” – Gregory D. Edgecombe, The Natural History Museum (London)

“An absorbing introduction to a rich source of paleontological information . . . fascinating color photographs . . . the book offers intriguing examples of how paleontology works . . . appealing scientific detective story.” – Kirkus Reviews

P79About the Author
Kenneth Gass, known as Chris to his family and friends, has a degree in Geological Sciences from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee. He has published in peer-reviewed journals and magazines, and he is content contributor to the Paleontology Portal and Paleobiology Database. Gass has also written books on subjects ranging from paleontology to procedures. One of his works relating to discoveries at Blackberry Hill received Honorable Mention for Best Paper Award.

Chris and his wife, Lauri, live in Wisconsin Rapids with their two dogs, not far from their six children and eleven grandchildren.

The Fossils of Blackberry Hill: Solving the Mystery of the First Animals on Land
Authored by Kenneth Gass
List Price: $29.95
Hardcover: 128 pages w/color photos
Publisher: Sunbury Press, Inc. (April 14, 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1620065878
ISBN-13: 978-1620065877
Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
Shipping Weight: 13.8 ounces
BISAC: Science / Paleontology

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-Fossils-of-Blackberr…

PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla.Keith Rommel’s latest novel, The Devil Tree, based on the Port St. Lucie, Florida legend is now available for pre-order on the Kindle platform.

tdt_fcAbout the Book:
Back in the 1970s, a series of bizarre incidents occurred at what has since been known as “The Devil Tree.”  Beneath this ancient denizen, evil was wrought by a sick serial killer, calling upon forces most evil and dark.  People were hung there … and bodies buried there … exhumed by the police.  Overcome by superstition, some tried to cut down the tree, to no avail.  Since then, it has stood in a remote section of a local park — left to its own devices — quiet in its eerie repose — until now!

Best-selling psychological-thriller author Keith Rommel has imagined the whole tale anew. He’s brought the tree to life and retold the tale with gory detail only possible in a fiction novel. Action-packed, with spine-tingling detail, this thriller is beyond parallel in the ground it uncovers … one author’s explanation of what may have really been said — what may have really happened — under Port St. Lucie’s “Devil Tree.”

Excerpt:
PICNIC
The past.
The big oak tree had crooked limbs that reached for the sky and a trunk over twenty feet in circumference. The thick canopy above blocked the midday sun, making the air seem ten degrees cooler than the scorching ninety-degree heat beating down from the hot Florida rays.

Port Saint Lucie was a quiet town and seemed to be a world within its own. Dirt roads and cheap housing had the allure to invite northern folks in hopes of escaping the bustle of city life, high costs of living, and the brutal cold winters that took their toll on the mind, body, and spirit.

For Marion, so far the change of pace was nothing short of perfect. The house she lived in was beautiful, her neighbors were pleasant; the air seemed cleaner and the sky a different kind of blue.

Looking at the ground surrounding the oak tree, she thought it the ideal spot to have a picnic with her two children, Bobby and Judy. She had Bobby carry the white and red checkered sheet, which was folded into a neat and manageable square. Judy helped by carrying the wicker picnic basket but struggled with the weight. Neither her mother or her brother offered to help her because she insisted she could do it and didn’t want help from anyone. Headstrong and full of temper, she was a handful.

Marion fiddled with a transistor radio and tried to get a clear signal so they could listen to music while they spent some quality family time on this perfect day out.

“Right here,” Marion said to Bobby, pointing at the flat ground underneath the giant oak. She mopped the sweat from her brow and looked up the hulking trunk and into the intricate weave of branches that was marvelous to the eyes. Spanish moss hung down, and if it wasn’t daytime the oak might have left the impression of a creepy Halloween prop.

Bobby placed the blanket down and did a fine job of getting all the wrinkles out of it. Marion assisted Judy in placing the basket down on the corner of the blanket, and although she didn’t say so, Marion thought she was thankful for the assistance.

She kicked off her shoes and stepped onto the squares and sat cross-legged. The ground was soft enough, and a coolness from the soil seeped up through the blanket, adding to the relief of being out of the direct sunlight.

“Yes, this is perfect,” Marion said, and the radio caught the marvelous chorus of “Norwegian Wood” by The Beatles. “Put your shoes off to the side before you step on the blanket,” she told the children. “I don’t want you tracking dirt all over the place before we eat.”

The kids did as they were told and Marion looked around, admiring the spot she had chosen. It was the first time she had been to this particular part of town and was glad she’d come across it. She had seen a couple of fishermen on her way in, tugging on the invisible lines they had cast and drinking Blue Ribbon beer. The men had looked over their shoulders at the sound of her car, but she had pulled far enough into the oversized lot that she couldn’t see them from her space.

The water in the canal looked clean enough to cool their feet if they needed, and the flow of water was slow enough that it posed little to no threat of sweeping them away. But she would decide whether or not they would go into the canal after the children had eaten and if they behaved well enough.

Bobby and Judy sat on the blanket, their legs folded Indian-style just like their mother. Bobby’s face lit up as he admired the giant oak and the things that dangled over him.

“Do you think I can climb it when we’re done eating?”

Marion thought about it. There was no question the tree was strong enough to hold him. But the sharp angles of the branches and clumps of Spanish moss made her nervous. She’d heard something about there being chiggers in moss. Despite the warm weather, she shivered just thinking about those nasty biting mites.

“I don’t know, Bobby, let Mommy think about it,” she said but already knew the answer to be no. She just didn’t want to start the picnic on a negative. “Let’s eat some lunch then afterward I’d like to go down to the water there and have a look. Maybe we can get our feet wet.”

“Neat, Mom,” Bobby said.

Static filled the Zenith 500 transistor radio, and Marion fiddled with the small dial, delicately turning it until the tuning was sharp. The Beatles came back to life and she couldn’t help but sing along in an emotional whisper.

She opened the basket and handed Bobby and Judy their bologna sandwiches, which were cut into fours. The children placed them into their laps and ate neatly and with manners.

“How did you find this place, Mom? It’s really neat,” Bobby said and was unable to keep his eyes out of the canopy. The tree seemed to invite him up the hefty trunk and into the tangle of branches. The vantage point from up there must be spectacular, he thought, and he bit into his sandwich with an ailing whine in an attempt to sway his mother’s thinking.

Marion ignored him and continued to take in her surroundings. Their 1966 Studebaker Wagonaire was parked about thirty yards away, cooking in the midday heat. She grabbed her own sandwich and unfolded the foil. As she sat there, taking tiny bites, a sudden chill rocked her body. The cold that came up through the ground and the shade of the giant oak maybe took away too much of the warmth, she decided. Marion looked at her children with the flesh goosed on her arms.

“Are you guys cold at all?”

“No,” Judy said. “It’s nice here. I like it, Mommy.”

“Yeah, Mom, it’s really neat here.”

The Devil Tree
Authored by Keith Rommel
List Price: $7.99
Kindle platform
BISAC: Fiction / Thriller

For more information, please see:
http://www.amazon.com/Devil-Tree-Keith-Rommel-ebook/dp/B0…

kstssv_fcHARRISBURG, Pa.Sunbury Press has released Keystone Tombstones Susquehanna Valley by Joe Farrell and Joe Farley.

About the Book:
Biographies of famous people buried in the Susquehanna Valley are the focus of this localized edition of the Keystone Tombstones. Farrell and Farley have combed Central Pennsylvania to bring you the most entertaining tales about interesting people buried in Pennsylvania. Included in this volume:

Adams County

  • John Burns
  • Gettysburg National Cemetery
  • Amos Humiston
  • Eddie Plank
  • Ginnie Wade

Berks County

  • Joe Toye
  • John Updike

Cumberland County

  • Babes in the Woods
  • Lincoln Colored Cemetery
  • Molly Pitcher

Centre County

  • Andrew Gregg Curtin
  • Joe Paterno

Dauphin County

  • Simon Cameron
  • John White Geary
  • Milton Hershey
  • Vance Criswell McCormick

Franklin County

  • Nellie Fox

Lancaster County

  • James Buchanan
  • Robert Hess
  • Thomas Mifflin
  • John Fulton Reynolds
  • Thaddeus Stevens
  • General John Sutter
  • Dick Winters
  • Zion Hill Cemetery

Lycoming County

  • Carl Stotz

Perry County

  • Billie Cox

Union County

  • Christy Mathewson

York County

  • William Franklin
  • Philip Livingston

Keystone Tombstones Susquehanna Valley: Biographies of Famous People Buried in Pennsylvania
Authored by Joe Farrell, Authored by Joe Farley, Authored by Lawrence Knorr
List Price: $16.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on White paper
202 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620065556
ISBN-10: 162006555X
BISAC: Biography & Autobiography / Rich & Famous

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Keystone-Tombstones-Susq…

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