Feeds:
Posts
Comments

LANCASTER, Pa.Sunbury Press has released Plain and Deadly, Barbara Workinger’s latest novel in the Life as a P.I. hasn’t always been what Ellerie March envisioned for herself. With a caseload mostly resembling the domestic scenarios on Jerry Springer, she’s not exactly working high-profile cases or helping to stop deadly criminals in their tracks. That is, until she meets Liddy and Annie Beiler—two Pennsylvania Amish women who have discovered an abandoned baby … or so they say. El takes the case in hopes of locating the baby’s missing mother, only to find herself in the midst of a homicide investigation and all too close to the family who might be responsible for this whole mess. Set against the backdrop of Pennsylvania and Ohio Amish country, city girl El casts her net for suspects—some of whom are the very people she needs to rely on to solve the case. Though she knows about keeping friends close and enemies closer, the lines of who is who become blurred in this “whodunit” escapade … especially when an unexpected romance springs up in the middle of everything, much to the delight of El’s grandmother and investigative “partner.”Through the course of the investigation, El uncovers not only secrets about the Amish and their friends, but also discovers special relationships she could have only found by following her instincts and her heart. The desperate search for the truth reaches its peak in a land where El thought the world would always be simple and safe, proving that even the most unsuspecting of places can be both Plain and Deadly.

pad_fcExcerpt:
“Care to elaborate on who is in the waiting room? And why they are here?” I suggested, trying to sound more patient than I felt.

“Two Amish ladies. Dressed Amish at least, of course they could be.”

“Tracy, cut the speculation. Let’s assume they are Amish. Did they say why they wanted to see me?”

“It’s something about a missing person. That was all they said.” Tracy narrowed her eyes. I could almost see the black and white 16-millimeter film running in her one-track mind. “What do you think?” she asked.

“I think you’d better show them in, Tracy.”

“OK,” she whispered, removing handfuls of papers from the two chairs that faced my desk.

A few minutes later, the two women were seated across from me. Amish they were. I’d seen enough Amish in my growing up years in Lancaster to know the real thing when I saw it. And knowing that, I was as surprised as Tracy was to have the pair in my office. It was a first for me and I’d venture it was a rarity for any investigator. The Amish had little need to frequent a domestic investigator’s office.

The elder of the two introduced herself as Liddy Beiler. Liddy was in her early forties, I guessed. Hard to tell. Amish women, without any help from cosmetics and beauticians usually looked older than the “English”—which was how they referred to the non-Amish. Despite, or maybe because of the natural look, Liddy was beautiful in a serene, clear-eyed way. Glossy dark hair was pulled away from her face and showed only slightly from its containment beneath her black bonnet. She was also very plump. Maybe that accounted for the absence of lines in her face.

The younger woman, twentyish Annie Beiler, was Liddy’s daughter-in-law. If Liddy was beautiful, Annie was drop-dead gorgeous. Huge luminous blue eyes stared out from a perfect oval face. Despite her attempt to tame her ash-blond hair beneath a traditional Amish prayer cap, it curled out in becoming tendrils around her face. Amish or not, I imagine every male from nine to ninety noticed Annie.

In Annie’s arms a rosy-faced baby of about two or three months of age slept peacefully, wrapped snugly in a miniature Amish patchwork quilt.

“What a sweet baby you have,” I said, my not-so-well-hidden maternal instincts turned on full blast.

“Oh, he’s not mine,” Annie said. I thought she looked momentarily sad when she said it. I had obviously been spending too much time around Tracy: everything seemed like a scene in an old movie.

“Oh?” I said to no one in particular.

“He—we call him Jeremiah—is why we are here,” Liddy said, answering what was to be my opening question if I hadn’t been too besotted with small Jeremiah to remember to ask it. Liddy spoke formally, using very few contractions and had a decided Pennsylvania Dutch accent, pronouncing the “J” in Jeremiah like a “Ch,” making the name sound like Cheremiah. Her voice was smooth, the tone soothing. Reminded me of a few shrinks I’d met in my work.

“He is?” I said. In a few moments I mentally examined and discarded several of possibilities as to why.

“Yes. It is Jeremiah why we are here … and this note.” She fished in her commodious black purse, coming out with a neatly folded piece of paper. She handed it over, carefully lifting it high over the clutter of my desk. I wondered how Liddy, with her Amish sense of neatness and order, could stand my office. I would learn later that the Amish don’t judge the English, although they do wonder about us.

“We want to hire you,” she continued in the direct, no-time-for-useless-preliminaries way the Amish have.

I read the note, which looked to be hastily but legibly printed on the kind of lined paper I’d noticed the Amish usually used for correspondence.

“To Liddy Beiler, midwife: I am leaving this Amish babe with you because it is the only safe place for an Amish child. You must keep him for just two weeks already. I am in danger and he will be, too, if he is found with me. If he is given to the English I will maybe be killed. I need to fix up some trouble and I will come for him. Bless you.”

The note was signed “A Mom.”

About the Author:
In writing her mysteries, Barbara Workinger draws on her background as a research journalist, an antique dealer, and an interest in the art of quilting. She combines them with a fascination for the Amish area where she lived for over twenty years. Ten of those years were spent in researching the Amish.

Plain and Deadly: An Ellerie March Mystery
Authored by Barbara Workinger
List Price: $16.95
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
214 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620064634
ISBN-10: 1620064634
BISAC: Fiction / Mystery & Detective / Women Sleuths

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Plain-and-Deadly-9781620…

PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla.Keith Rommel’s latest novel, The Devil Tree, based on the Port St. Lucie, Florida legend is has been released in hardcover.

tdt_fcAbout the Book:
Back in the 1970s, a series of bizarre incidents occurred at what has since been known as “The Devil Tree.”  Beneath this ancient denizen, evil was wrought by a sick serial killer, calling upon forces most evil and dark.  People were hung there … and bodies buried there … exhumed by the police.  Overcome by superstition, some tried to cut down the tree, to no avail.  Since then, it has stood in a remote section of a local park — left to its own devices — quiet in its eerie repose — until now!

Best-selling psychological-thriller author Keith Rommel has imagined the whole tale anew. He’s brought the tree to life and retold the tale with gory detail only possible in a fiction novel. Action-packed, with spine-tingling detail, this thriller is beyond parallel in the ground it uncovers … one author’s explanation of what may have really been said — what may have really happened — under Port St. Lucie’s “Devil Tree.”

Excerpt:
PICNIC
The past.
The big oak tree had crooked limbs that reached for the sky and a trunk over twenty feet in circumference. The thick canopy above blocked the midday sun, making the air seem ten degrees cooler than the scorching ninety-degree heat beating down from the hot Florida rays.

Port Saint Lucie was a quiet town and seemed to be a world within its own. Dirt roads and cheap housing had the allure to invite northern folks in hopes of escaping the bustle of city life, high costs of living, and the brutal cold winters that took their toll on the mind, body, and spirit.

For Marion, so far the change of pace was nothing short of perfect. The house she lived in was beautiful, her neighbors were pleasant; the air seemed cleaner and the sky a different kind of blue.

Looking at the ground surrounding the oak tree, she thought it the ideal spot to have a picnic with her two children, Bobby and Judy. She had Bobby carry the white and red checkered sheet, which was folded into a neat and manageable square. Judy helped by carrying the wicker picnic basket but struggled with the weight. Neither her mother or her brother offered to help her because she insisted she could do it and didn’t want help from anyone. Headstrong and full of temper, she was a handful.

Marion fiddled with a transistor radio and tried to get a clear signal so they could listen to music while they spent some quality family time on this perfect day out.

“Right here,” Marion said to Bobby, pointing at the flat ground underneath the giant oak. She mopped the sweat from her brow and looked up the hulking trunk and into the intricate weave of branches that was marvelous to the eyes. Spanish moss hung down, and if it wasn’t daytime the oak might have left the impression of a creepy Halloween prop.

Bobby placed the blanket down and did a fine job of getting all the wrinkles out of it. Marion assisted Judy in placing the basket down on the corner of the blanket, and although she didn’t say so, Marion thought she was thankful for the assistance.

She kicked off her shoes and stepped onto the squares and sat cross-legged. The ground was soft enough, and a coolness from the soil seeped up through the blanket, adding to the relief of being out of the direct sunlight.

“Yes, this is perfect,” Marion said, and the radio caught the marvelous chorus of “Norwegian Wood” by The Beatles. “Put your shoes off to the side before you step on the blanket,” she told the children. “I don’t want you tracking dirt all over the place before we eat.”

The kids did as they were told and Marion looked around, admiring the spot she had chosen. It was the first time she had been to this particular part of town and was glad she’d come across it. She had seen a couple of fishermen on her way in, tugging on the invisible lines they had cast and drinking Blue Ribbon beer. The men had looked over their shoulders at the sound of her car, but she had pulled far enough into the oversized lot that she couldn’t see them from her space.

The water in the canal looked clean enough to cool their feet if they needed, and the flow of water was slow enough that it posed little to no threat of sweeping them away. But she would decide whether or not they would go into the canal after the children had eaten and if they behaved well enough.

Bobby and Judy sat on the blanket, their legs folded Indian-style just like their mother. Bobby’s face lit up as he admired the giant oak and the things that dangled over him.

“Do you think I can climb it when we’re done eating?”

Marion thought about it. There was no question the tree was strong enough to hold him. But the sharp angles of the branches and clumps of Spanish moss made her nervous. She’d heard something about there being chiggers in moss. Despite the warm weather, she shivered just thinking about those nasty biting mites.

“I don’t know, Bobby, let Mommy think about it,” she said but already knew the answer to be no. She just didn’t want to start the picnic on a negative. “Let’s eat some lunch then afterward I’d like to go down to the water there and have a look. Maybe we can get our feet wet.”

“Neat, Mom,” Bobby said.

Static filled the Zenith 500 transistor radio, and Marion fiddled with the small dial, delicately turning it until the tuning was sharp. The Beatles came back to life and she couldn’t help but sing along in an emotional whisper.

She opened the basket and handed Bobby and Judy their bologna sandwiches, which were cut into fours. The children placed them into their laps and ate neatly and with manners.

“How did you find this place, Mom? It’s really neat,” Bobby said and was unable to keep his eyes out of the canopy. The tree seemed to invite him up the hefty trunk and into the tangle of branches. The vantage point from up there must be spectacular, he thought, and he bit into his sandwich with an ailing whine in an attempt to sway his mother’s thinking.

Marion ignored him and continued to take in her surroundings. Their 1966 Studebaker Wagonaire was parked about thirty yards away, cooking in the midday heat. She grabbed her own sandwich and unfolded the foil. As she sat there, taking tiny bites, a sudden chill rocked her body. The cold that came up through the ground and the shade of the giant oak maybe took away too much of the warmth, she decided. Marion looked at her children with the flesh goosed on her arms.

“Are you guys cold at all?”

“No,” Judy said. “It’s nice here. I like it, Mommy.”

“Yeah, Mom, it’s really neat here.”

The Devil Tree
Authored by Keith Rommel

List Price: $29.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on White paper
192 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620065884
ISBN-10: 1620065880
BISAC: Fiction / Occult & Supernatural

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-Devil-Tree-9781620065884.htm

Sunbury Press has released the bestsellers list for April, 2015. Chris Papst’s expose on the financial collapse of Harrisburg, Capital Murder, took the top spot., followed by the Bethel AME church history Along the Bethel Trail.Flying Pants, by Lola James, claimed the third spot.

SUNBURY PRESS – Bestsellers for April, 2015 (by Revenue)
Rank Last Month Title Author Category
1 23 Capital Murder Chris Papst Investigation
2 NEW Along the Bethel Trail Friends of Bethel AME History
3 Flying Pants Lola James Childrens
4 As the Paint Dries Carrie Wissler-Thomas History
5 16 Call Sign Dracula Joe Fair War Memoir
6 26 Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last Mike Campbell History
7 NEW The B Team Alan Mindell Sports Fiction
8 Rising Hope Marie Sontag Historical Fiction
9 25 The Wolf of Britannia, Part I Jess Steven Hughes Historical Fiction
10 24 Jesus the Phoenician Karim El Koussa Religious History
11 There Is Something About Rough & Ready Lawrence Knorr et al History
12 5 Rising Sun Descending Wade Fowler Thriller Fiction
13 18 Pit Bulls Anthony Julian History
14 NEW Keystone Tombstones Anthracite Region Farrell and Farley Biography
15 NEW Keystone Tombstones Susquehanna Valley Farrell and Farley Biography
16 8 The Complete Story of the Worldwide Invasion of the Orange Orbs Terry Ray Paranormal
17 9 The Sign of the Eagle Jess Steven Hughes Historical Fiction
18 Indian Villages and Place Names in Pennsylvania George Donehoo History
19 Freemasons at Gettysburg Sheldon Munn History
20 The Wolf of Britannia, Part II Jess Steven Hughes Historical Fiction
21 1 H Is for Hershey Heather Paterno Childrens
22 12 Winter of the Metal People Dennis Herrick Historical Fiction
23 30 That Night at Surigao M Ernest Marshall History
24 3 The Fossils of Blackberry Hill Kenneth Gass Paleontology
25 Bows, Bullets, and Bears John L. Moore History
26 Pioneers, Prisoners, and Peace Pipes John L. Moore History
27 Forts, Forests, and Flintlocks John L. Moore History
28 Cannons, Cattle, and Campfires John L. Moore History
29 Traders, Travelers, and Tomahawks John L. Moore History
30 Rivers, Raiders, and Renegades John L. Moore History

cm_fcApril has been a historically weak month for Sunbury Press. The company had its 2nd best April ever. YTD Sales are up 77% from last year. Hardcover books have grown to a 36% share of sales. EBooks have now slipped to less than 3.9% of sales. Trade paperbacks remain steady at 54%.

Chris Papst’s Capital Murder grabbed the top spot thanks to advance sales and author activity. Along the Bethel Trail, by the Friends of the Bethel AME, was also helped by advance sales. Lola James’s childrens book Flying Pants soared to #3 due to author events. Carrie Wissler-Thomas’s As the Paint Dries was boosted to #4 by ongoing sales at the Art Association of Harrisburg. Call Sign Dracula, the Vietnam memoir by Joe Fair, continued to chart at #5 thanks to steady sales in bookstores. Mike Campbell’s Amelia Earhart: The Truth at Last, soared to #6, up 20 spots, thanks to ongoing interest in the lost aviatrix. Alan Mindell’s new horse racing novel, The B Team, debuted at #7 thanks to support from his reader base. Rising Hope, Marie Sontag’s first volume in the Warsaw Rising Trilogy, charted at #8 due to author activities. Jess Steven Hughes nabbed 3 spots: #9 with The Wolf of Britannia Part I, #17 with The Sign of the Eagle, and #20 with The Wolf of Britannia Part II. Hughes benefitted from multiple books at his regular bookstore events. Karim El Koussa’s Jesus the Phoenician rose to #10 from combined sales of the paperback, ebook, and hardcover editions. There Is Something about Rough and Ready, by Lawrence Knorr, Steve Troutman, Elaine Moran, Cindy Baum, Christine Hipple, and Jeanne Adams returned to the rankings at #11 thanks to sales in the Rough & Ready area. Wade Fowler’s novel Rising Sun Descending slipped to #12 the month after his Sunbury Press Store event. Anthony Julian’s ever-present Pit Bulls moved up a few spots to #13 because of ongoing interest in the subject matter. The Joes, Farrell and Farley, grabbed numbers 14 & 15 due to regional interest in with two of their newly-released books: Keystone atbt_fc smTombstones Anthracite Region and Keystone Tombstones Susquehanna Valley. Terry Ray’s popular The Complete Story of the Worldwide Invasion of the Orange Orbs stayed on the chart at #16 thanks to ongoing interest in the UFO phenomenom. George Donehoo’s classic Indian Villages and Place Names in Pennsylvania joined the rankings at #18 due to sales in the up state. Sheldon Munn’s Freemasons at Gettysburg climbed to #19 due to orders from Gettysburg retailers in advance of Memorial Day. Heather Paterno’s H Is for Hershey slipped to #21 following her event at the Hershey Historical Society. Dennis Herrick maintained #22, slipping 10 spots, with his Winter of the Metal People. The book is popular in New Mexico. Ernie Marshall’s That Night at Surigao climbed 7 spots to #23 thanks to interest in the last fight between battleships in WW2. Kenneth Gass’s The Fossils of Blackberry Hill preserved #24 thanks to author activities. John L. Moore grabbed the remaining spots #’s 25 to 30 with 6 of the 8 books in his Frontier Pennsylvania Series: Bows, Bullets, and Bears, Pioneers, Prisoners, and Peace Pipes, Forts, Forests, and Flintlocks, Cannons, Cattle, and Campfires, Traders, Travelers, and Tomahawks, and Rivers, Raiders, and Renegades.

The company released nine new titles during the month of April.

SUNBURY PRESS – New Releases for April, 2015
Charlie Caw Paul Argentini YA Fiction
Capital Murder Chris Papst Investigation
Keystone Tombstones Philadelphia Region Farrell and Farley Biography
Along the Bethel Trail Friends of Bethel AME History
The Fossils of Blackberry Hill Kenneth Gass Paleontology
Keystone Tombstones Susquehanna Valley Farrell and Farley Biography
The B Team Alan Mindell Sports Fiction
Keystone Tombstones Anthracite Region Farrell and Farley Biography
The Best of Keystone Tombstones Farrell and Farley Biography

For a list of Sunbury’s best-sellers, please see the Sunbury Press web site:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/BESTSELLERS_c3.htm
For a complete list of recent and upcoming releases, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/COMING-SOON_c47.htm

VENICE, Fla.Sunbury Press has released Charlie Caw, Paul Argentini’s latest novel, for middle grade and young adults.

cc_fcAbout the Book:
A crow that picks wildflowers and delivers them to show affection, and a fatherless boy who teaches the bird how to fly create a heartwarming story of these two disparate beings going and growing with one another. Their deep and abiding companionship keeps them close, yet they remain free to maintain all their relationships. Each protects the other in awkward situations, but they respect one another to allow the freedom to make individual choices. They confront humorous and dangerous situations with daring spirit learning a bit more of the other’s world with each confrontation. CHARLIE CAW is such a likeable story one can only believe it is true. It will find a niche in your memory for a long, long time.

Excerpt:
Charlie Partridge caught at his breath with the firing squad’s volley. His body tensed. He expected the bullets to tear through his clothes and into his flesh. He felt as if they already had.

It was the nightmare. Again.

The panorama of the cemetery flashed into his mind. There was the October mackerel sky and the flag-draped casket suspended over the blackness. Standing were dozens of people wearing mask-like faces. As he had never seen her, there was his mother sitting under the canopy: her face white and drawn, her eyes glowing briquettes, her lips held tight to a slash. There was the bass-drum monotone of the minister uttering profundities. There was the cadre of officers and the honor guard who had escorted the fallen decorated hero to this country gravesite with its majesty of flowers. There was the formal precision of the military funeral. These ceremonies were for his father, Lt. James Partridge, but he hoped they had made a mistake and it really was someone else.

More volleys followed.

Charlie wondered if such a barrage had also resounded before the hero had died. He wondered if he, too, had smelled the acrid smoke from burning gunpowder.

Charlie watched the haze settle softly among the blades of dew-damp grass. Then, closing his eyes, he saw himself start to fall as if into an abyss of reverie: it was dawn. His father whistled, as usual, as he slipped into his bedroom to wake him. As they had done so many times before, father, mother, and son grabbed a quick breakfast and the fishing gear, then the three of them were off. Shortly thereafter, he stood shivering in the gurgle and splash of the spring-fed brook where the bespeckled trout hid.

Charlie opened his eyes. A stern-faced officer bowed before Charlie’s mother. He offered her the triangularly-folded American flag. With yet another rush of tears, she took it and clutched it to her breast. Without straightening, the officer turned to Charlie seated beside her, and their eyes locked. As if taking part in a conspiracy, he signaled Charlie with a slight nod.

He watched the officer perform an agonizingly slow salute to his mother and to the flag. Charlie felt the wet at the small of his back turn cold. Then, the officer beckoned with his fingers and nodded, indicating Charlie was to follow him. Charlie stood. They walked to the far end of the headstone-studded field.

“We need to talk,” the officer said to Charlie.

Charlie stared at his medals, then at the man’s chest. “Your shirt is stained, sir,” Charlie said.

“I apologize if it troubles you,” he said pointing, “but this is a blood stain from the wound that earned me the Silver Star Medal and took my life. That’s what happened to your father,” the officer responded. “Only those who have been wounded in battle may have the honor of participating in the ceremonies for a fallen comrade. It is my privilege and honor to be here.” The officer turned toward the knot of people surrounding the open grave, then asked, “Were you and your dad close, Charlie?”

Charlie raised his eyebrows and looked up at the man, nodding his head for several seconds, then said, “Sir, I must go home. Now.”

“Sorry, son,” he said. “To leave this cemetery, you need to be brave; you need to be courageous and you need to be strong. You must allow yourself to cry. You must accept what has happened. This funeral will go on until you accept the fact that your dad is not coming back. When you acknowledge that, then this funeral will end.”

“Everything was so sudden,” Charlie said.

The officer put his hand on Charlie’s shoulder and said, “You can only deny this for so long.” The soldier’s face grew even more somber as he folded his arms and continued, “Time is another problem. When is your next birthday?”

“June sixteenth. I’ll be fourteen.”

“Fourteen! Is that so? You seem older. The fact is, your next birthday, that’s your deadline.”

“Deadline?” Charlie flexed his eyebrows. “Why a deadline?”

The officer shrugged. “Son, many brave men and women fall in battle. Each one deserves to be commemorated, such as we are doing now for your dad. But, we only have so much time for each funeral, or we’d fall way behind. We want to serve everyone their full measure of respect. Once you acknowledge that it is your father’s funeral, you will be through with the formalities, the grieving, and with us here at the cemetery. It will allow us to move on with our work, and you can get on with your life.”

“Thank you, Sir”, Charlie said. “All I know is that something important has changed in my life. It’s so confusing, and I don’t understand any of it.”

“I regret to say understanding will come with time. Meanwhile, it’s like getting measles, you just have to work through it,” the officer said. “The apparitions and demons must be worse.”

Charlie felt the muscles in his face tighten. “Yes, they’re just awful. They’re frightening.” He pulled his shoulders back and said, “Mother’s alone. I must go.” He turned and marched with the officer back to the ceremony.

The brittle, dredging notes of the bugler’s taps consumed the air as if to suffocate Charlie.

He found his arms tight around his mother with his face buried in the folded flag, her spasms pulsating through and shaking his body for an endless moment. Then, taking his mother’s lead, he tried to place the rose he found in his hand on the imposing coffin. He could not let go of the stem – it stuck to his fingers! Shake as hard as he could, the flower still clung to him, and he felt it draw him into the void beneath the casket.

Charlie Caw
Authored by Paul Argentini
List Price: $24.95
Hardcover: 154 pages
Publisher: Sunbury Press, Inc. (April 23, 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1620065851
ISBN-13: 978-1620065853
Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.4 x 9 inches
Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
BISAC: Fiction / Young Adult / Relationships

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Charlie-Caw-978162006585…

HARRISBURG, Pa.Sunbury Press has released Capital Murder: An investigative reporter’s hunt for answers in a collapsing city, Chris Papst’s expose of the recent financial troubles in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, the state capital.

cm_fcAbout the Book:
Every city in America is unique. Each has its own instructive tale of success and failure. What makes Harrisburg, Pennsylvania’s story most valuable lies not in its life but in its death – and in the actions of those who killed it.

In late 2011, Harrisburg became the first – and only – capital city in American history to file for bankruptcy. For four years, investigative reporter Chris Papst provided award-winning coverage of this unprecedented financial collapse. Now, he has authored a book sharing his experiences while detailing what went wrong.

Excerpt:
In two-and-a-half years, I filed more than 200 reports on Harrisburg’s financial collapse and the hapless residents it affected. Nearly every day something news-worthy happened—and little of it good.

Yet, despite my built-in safeguards, the abhorrent nature of Harrisburg’s demise eventually wore on my psyche. After hundreds of depressing reports, day-after-day, I started to break. This was where I worked. This was my home state’s capital city. I had friends who lived and raised families here. I wanted Harrisburg to win. But it seemed impossible.

People were made massively wealthy issuing the bond deals that capsized Harrisburg. But every day at 4:00, I watched as the protagonists whoallowed it to happen hopped in their foreign sports sedans and fled town. They left behind a broke and broken city, and not one person was heldaccountable. No arrests. No charges.No indictments. No restitution. The city was financially dead, but apparently no one killed it.

For the longest time, I couldn’t understand how a city could have been so financially raped. How could the residents allow it to happen? More importantly, how could the media allow it to happen? In a democracy, where everyone has the right to free speech, and the right to assemble and petition, how is this possible? It took me years to truly understand. And once I finally did, I found it necessary to write this book.  — Chris Papst

bio_1About the Author
Chris Papst
is a multiple Emmy-award winning investigative reporter whose work has initiated changes in law and sparked criminal investigations. He currently works at ABC 7/WJLA in Washington, DC.

Capital Murder
Authored by Chris Papst
List Price: $29.95
Hardcover: 244 pages
Publisher: Sunbury Press, Inc. (April 22, 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1620065916
ISBN-13: 978-1620065914
Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 9 inches
Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
BISAC: Government / State & Local / Pennsylvania

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Capital-Murder-978162006…. (http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-B-Team-9781620065952…)

kstsph_fcPHILADELPHIASunbury Press has released Keystone Tombstones Philadelphia Region by Joe Farrell and Joe Farley.

About the Book:
Biographies of famous people buried in the Philadelphia Region are the focus of this first localized edition of the Keystone Tombstones. Farrell and Farley have combed the Philadelphia area to bring you the most entertaining tales about interesting people buried in Pennsylvania. Included in this volume:

Bucks County

  • Pearl Buck
  • Saint Katherine Drexel
  • Tom Gola

Chester County

  • Smedley Butler
  • Jim Croce

Delaware County

  • Marian Anderson
  • Paul Arizin
  • John McDermott
  • Herman Webster Mudgett aka Dr. Henry H. Holmes
  • Danny Murtaugh
  • Philadelphia Sinners
  • Bessie Smith
  • Anthony Wayne

Montgomery County

  • Alan Ameche
  • Richie Ashburn
  • Lafayette C. Baker
  • De Bonneville “Bert” Bell
  • Jay Cooke
  • Dave Garroway
  • Winfield Scott Hancock
  • John Hartranft
  • Herman Haupt
  • Teddy Pendergrass
  • Arlen Specter
  • Grover Washington Jr.
  • Harry Wright
  • Samuel K. Zook

Philadelphia County

  • William (Willie) Law Anderson
  • John Barrymore
  • Ulric Dahlgren
  • Four Founders
  • Samuel W. Crawford
  • Benjamin Franklin
  • Joe Frazier
  • General Controversy
  • Franklin Gowen
  • Harry Norbert Kalas
  • Oliver B. Knowles
  • Connie Mack
  • George Meade
  • Robert Morris & James Wilson
  • St. Clair Augustine Mulholland
  • Saint John Newman
  • Dennis O’Kane
  • John C. Pemberton
  • Galusha Pennypacker
  • Frank Rizzo
  • Bill Tilden
  • John Wanamaker

Keystone Tombstones Philadelphia Region: Biographies of Famous People Buried in Pennsylvania
Authored by Joe Farrell, Authored by Joe Farley, Authored by Lawrence Knorr
List Price: $19.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on White paper
360 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620065457
ISBN-10: 1620065452
BISAC: Biography & Autobiography / Rich & Famous

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Keystone-Tombstones-Phil…

HARRISBURG, Pa.Sunbury Press has released Along the Bethel Trail: The Journey of an African American Faith Community presented by Friends of the Bethel Trail.

About the Book:

Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church of Harrisburg, 1835 – 2015

atbt_fc smThroughout its history, the Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church of Harrisburg has been a critical link in the chain of places, people, and events that bind and strengthen Pennsylvania’s quest for equity, parity, and social justice. Along the Bethel Trail is an anthology of articles by area authors, scholars and humanists that guides readers through the history of this resilient congregation in relationship to the legacy and impact on the community that it serves. Each contributing author writes of a specific historical period and geographic site where the church was located. From that vantage point, the authors explore the social and civic engagement of the congregation and its leadership in time and place, as the church and surrounding communities were continuously uprooted to make room for the expanding state capitol complex. Together their articles frame the impact of the church and congregation on the development of Harrisburg’s diverse community. The combined articles also articulate the struggle of Harrisburg’s African-American community for economic development, sustainability, and a sense of place over the past 180 years.

The anthology of articles supports the eight paneled interpretive signage and self-guided experience along Harrisburg’s Bethel Trail. Discover the location of Bethel’s first church at the current Amtrak station, key 19thcentury sites at Harrisburg’s Forum, Fountain, and Justice buildings along Commonwealth Ave, its 20th century site at 6th and Herr and Bethel’s current 21st century home in midtowns at 1721 N.5th street.

Along the Bethel Trail: The Journey of an African American Faith Community
Authored by Lenwood O. Sloan, Nancy Mendes, and Michael L. Barton
List Price: $29.95
Hardcover: 60 pages
Publisher: Sunbury Press, Inc. (April 15, 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 162006586X
ISBN-13: 978-1620065860
Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 0.3 x 11 inches
Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
BISAC: History / African American

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Along-the-Bethel-Trail-9…

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 71 other followers